USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Page 3 sur 4 Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Sam 9 Oct - 22:46

A propos des complots et de la vocation démocratique des ONG nord américaine, un article sur voltaire.

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  kercoz le Dim 10 Oct - 8:03

Arno a écrit:A propos des complots et de la vocation démocratique des ONG nord américaine, un article sur voltaire.
Que diable allait il faire ds cette galère ?
////Pour encadrer les principaux partis politiques dans le monde, l’IRI et le NDI ont renoncé à contrôler l’Internationale libérale et l’Internationale socialiste. Ils ont donc créé des organisations rivales, l’Union démocratique internationale (IDU) et l’Alliance des démocrates (AD). La première est présidée par l’Australien John Howard. Le Russe Leonid Gozman de Juste cause (Правое дело) en est vice-président. La seconde est dirigée par l’Italien Gianni Vernetti et co-présidée par le Français François Bayrou./////

kercoz

Messages : 965
Date d'inscription : 24/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Mer 3 Nov - 0:20

Elections 2010 Battle for the Senate

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Jeu 11 Nov - 12:48

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:45, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  nemo111 le Jeu 11 Nov - 16:36

C'est un jeu qui dure depuis de nombreuses années déjà les cache-caches entre sous marin et porte avion. C'est loin d'être la premiére fois que des sous-marins chinois surprennent des navires tazus. Avant cela c'était avec les soviétiques. Les tazus savent bien et depuis longtemps que la défense contre les sous-marins est extrêmement difficile. C'est pas un hasard si c'est une priorité dans la défense de nombreux pays : Russie, France, Royaume Unis et d'autres...
En Russie par exemple les missiles nucléaires qui peuvent être lancé à partir de sous-marins (les fameux boulavas, pas encore complétement au point) sont le domaine militaire qui a connu le moins de restriction budgétaire suite à la chute de l'Union Soviétique.

nemo111

Messages : 679
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Ven 12 Nov - 1:30

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:46, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Sam 27 Nov - 18:49

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:46, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Dim 28 Nov - 21:11

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:46, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  yvesT75 le Lun 29 Nov - 0:57

Pas mal d'extraits intéressants sur le site du New york times :

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/world/statessecrets.html?src=ISMR_AP_LO_MST_FB

Par exemple :


• Grave fears in Washington and London over the security of Pakistan's nuclear weapons programme, with officials warning that as the country faces economic collapse, government employees could smuggle out enough nuclear material for terrorists to build a bomb.

• Suspicions of corruption in the Afghan government, with one cable alleging that vice president Zia Massoud was carrying $52m in cash when he was stopped during a visit to the United Arab Emirates. Massoud denies taking money out of Afghanistan.

• How the hacker attacks which forced Google to quit China in January were orchestrated by a senior member of the Politburo who typed his own name into the global version of the search engine and found articles criticising him personally.

• The extraordinarily close relationship between Vladimir Putin, the Russian prime minister, and Silvio Berlusconi, the Italian prime minister, which is causing intense US suspicion. Cables detail allegations of "lavish gifts", lucrative energy contracts and the use by Berlusconi of a "shadowy" Russian-speaking Italian go-between.

• Allegations that Russia and its intelligence agencies are using mafia bosses to carry out criminal operations, with one cable reporting that the relationship is so close that the country has become a "virtual mafia state".

•  Devastating criticism of the UK's military operations in Afghanistan by US commanders, the Afghan president and local officials in Helmand. The dispatches reveal particular contempt for the failure to impose security around Sangin – the town which has claimed more British lives than any other in the country.

• Inappropriate remarks by a member of the British royal family about a UK law enforcement agency and a foreign country.

The US has particularly intimate dealings with Britain, and some of the dispatches from the London embassy in Grosvenor Square will make uncomfortable reading in Whitehall and Westminster. They range from political criticisms of David Cameron to requests for specific intelligence about individual MPs.

The cables contain specific allegations of corruption, as well as harsh criticism by US embassy staff of their host governments, from Caribbean islands to China and Russia. The material includes a reference to Putin as an "alpha-dog", Hamid Karzai as being "driven by paranoia" while Angela Merkel allegedly "avoids risk and is rarely creative". There is also a comparison between Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Adolf Hitler.

The cables names Saudi donors as the biggest financiers of terror groups, and provide an extraordinarily detailed account of an agreement between Washington and Yemen to cover up the use of US planes to bomb al-Qaida targets. One cable records that during a meeting in January with General David Petraeus, then US commander in the Middle East, Yemeni president Abdullah Saleh said: "We'll continue saying they are our bombs, not yours."

Other revelations include a description of a near "environmental disaster" last year over a rogue shipment of enriched uranium, technical details of secret US-Russian nuclear missile negotiations in Geneva, and a profile of Libya's Muammar Gaddafi, who they say is accompanied everywhere by a "voluptuous blonde" Ukrainian nurse.

A worldwide diplomatic crisis for the US is in prospect following the leaking of hundreds of thousands of secret cables sent from its embassies.

The dispatches, to which the Guardian has obtained unprecedented access, reveal startling information about the behaviour of the world's major superpower.

They include high-level allegations of corruption against foreign leaders, harsh criticisms and frank insights into the world of normally- secret diplomacy.

Among literallyscores of revelations which may cause uproar, some will be particularly dismaying in Britain. They include:

• Highly critical private remarks about David Cameron and George Osborne's "lack of depth", made by Mervyn King, the governor of the Bank of England, to the US ambassador.

• A scornful analysis of UK "paranoia" over the US-UK so-called special relationship. It is suggested that "keeping HMGthe British government "off-balance" about itthe relationship might be a good idea.

• US shock at the rude behaviour of Prince Andrew when abroad.

• Secret US military missions flown from a UK base, which Britain alleged could involve torture.

• A plan to deceive the British parliament over the use of banned US weapons.

The Guardian will be publishing extracts in the coming days from a selection of the most significant of more than 250,000 of these diplomatic cables, which were radioed back to Washington via satellite links from US embassies all over the world.

Among many allegations of corruption, the dispatches name a prominent western leader said to be in receipt of Russian bribes, a senior Afghan politician stopped at an airport with more than $50m in suitcases and a British businessman at the centre of a corruption scandal in Kazakhstan.

They name the "single most hated person" in a country the US relies on to help prosecute its war in Afghanistan; and they reveal deep fears about the safety of one state's nuclear weapons.

ou :




A dangerous standoff with Pakistan over nuclear fuel: Since 2007, the United States has mounted a highly secret effort, so far unsuccessful, to remove from a Pakistani research reactor highly enriched uranium that American officials fear could be diverted for use in an illicit nuclear device. In May 2009, Ambassador Anne W. Patterson reported that Pakistan was refusing to schedule a visit by American technical experts because, as a Pakistani official said, “if the local media got word of the fuel removal, ‘they certainly would portray it as the United States taking Pakistan’s nuclear weapons,’ he argued.”

¶ Gaming out an eventual collapse of North Korea: American and South Korean officials have discussed the prospects for a unified Korea, should the North’s economic troubles and political transition lead the state to implode. The South Koreans even considered commercial inducements to China, according to the American ambassador to Seoul. She told Washington in February that South Korean officials believe that the right business deals would “help salve” China’s “concerns about living with a reunified Korea” that is in a “benign alliance” with the United States.

¶ Bargaining to empty the Guantánamo Bay prison: When American diplomats pressed other countries to resettle detainees, they became reluctant players in a State Department version of “Let’s Make a Deal.” Slovenia was told to take a prisoner if it wanted to meet with President Obama, while the island nation of Kiribati was offered incentives worth millions of dollars to take in Chinese Muslim detainees, cables from diplomats recounted. The Americans, meanwhile, suggested that accepting more prisoners would be “a low-cost way for Belgium to attain prominence in Europe.”

¶ Suspicions of corruption in the Afghan government: When Afghanistan’s vice president visited the United Arab Emirates last year, local authorities working with the Drug Enforcement Administration discovered that he was carrying $52 million in cash. With wry understatement, a cable from the American Embassy in Kabul called the money “a significant amount” that the official, Ahmed Zia Massoud, “was ultimately allowed to keep without revealing the money’s origin or destination.” (Mr. Massoud denies taking any money out of Afghanistan.)

¶ A global computer hacking effort: China’s Politburo directed the intrusion into Google’s computer systems in that country, a Chinese contact told the American Embassy in Beijing in January, one cable reported. The Google hacking was part of a coordinated campaign of computer sabotage carried out by government operatives, private security experts and Internet outlaws recruited by the Chinese government. They have broken into American government computers and those of Western allies, the Dalai Lama and American businesses since 2002, cables said.

¶ Mixed records against terrorism: Saudi donors remain the chief financiers of Sunni militant groups like Al Qaeda, and the tiny Persian Gulf state of Qatar, a generous host to the American military for years, was the “worst in the region” in counterterrorism efforts, according to a State Department cable last December. Qatar’s security service was “hesitant to act against known terrorists out of concern for appearing to be aligned with the U.S. and provoking reprisals,” the cable said.

¶ An intriguing alliance: American diplomats in Rome reported in 2009 on what their Italian contacts described as an extraordinarily close relationship between Vladimir V. Putin, the Russian prime minister, and Silvio Berlusconi, the Italian prime minister and business magnate, including “lavish gifts,” lucrative energy contracts and a “shadowy” Russian-speaking Italian go-between. They wrote that Mr. Berlusconi “appears increasingly to be the mouthpiece of Putin” in Europe. The diplomats also noted that while Mr. Putin enjoys supremacy over all other public figures in Russia, he is undermined by an unmanageable bureaucracy that often ignores his edicts.

¶ Arms deliveries to militants: Cables describe the United States’ failing struggle to prevent Syria from supplying arms to Hezbollah in Lebanon, which has amassed a huge stockpile since its 2006 war with Israel. One week after President Bashar al-Assad promised a top State Department official that he would not send “new” arms to Hezbollah, the United States complained that it had information that Syria was providing increasingly sophisticated weapons to the group.

¶ Clashes with Europe over human rights: American officials sharply warned Germany in 2007 not to enforce arrest warrants for Central Intelligence Agency officers involved in a bungled operation in which an innocent German citizen with the same name as a suspected militant was mistakenly kidnapped and held for months in Afghanistan. A senior American diplomat told a German official “that our intention was not to threaten Germany, but rather to urge that the German government weigh carefully at every step of the way the implications for relations with the U.S.”

Our diplomats are just that, diplomats,” he said. “They represent our country around the world and engage openly and transparently with representatives of foreign governments and civil society. Through this process, they collect information that shapes our policies and actions. This is what diplomats, from our country and other countries, have done for hundreds of years.”

The cables, sent to embassies in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Latin America and the United States mission to the United Nations, provide no evidence that American diplomats are actively trying to steal the secrets of foreign countries, work that is traditionally the preserve of the nation’s spy agencies. While the State Department has long provided information about foreign officials’ duties to the Central Intelligence Agency to help build biographical profiles, the more intrusive personal information diplomats are now being asked to gather could be used by the National Security Agency for data mining and surveillance operations. A frequent-flier number, for example, could be used to track the travel plans of foreign officials.

Several of the cables also asked diplomats for details about the telecommunications networks supporting the military and intelligence agencies of foreign countries.

The United States regularly puts undercover intelligence officers in foreign countries posing as diplomats, but the vast majority of diplomats are not spies. Several retired ambassadors, told about the information-gathering assignments disclosed in the cables, expressed concern that State Department employees abroad could routinely come under suspicion of spying and find it difficult to carry out their work or even risk expulsion.

Ronald E. Neumann, a former American ambassador to Afghanistan, Algeria and Bahrain, said that Washington was constantly sending requests for voluminous information about foreign countries. But he said he was puzzled about why Foreign Service officers — who are not trained in clandestine collection methods — would be asked to gather information like credit card numbers.

“My concerns would be, first of all, whether the person could do this responsibly without getting us into trouble,” he said. “And, secondly, how much effort a person put into this at the expense of his or her regular duties.”

The requests made to State Department employees have come at a time when the nation’s spy agencies are struggling to meet the demands of two wars and a global hunt for militants. The Pentagon has also sharply expanded its intelligence work outside of war zones, sending teams of Special Operations troops to American embassies abroad to gather information about militant networks in various countries.

Unlike the thousands of cables, originally obtained by the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, that were sent from far-flung embassies to State Department headquarters, the roughly half-dozen cables from 2008 and 2009 detailing the more aggressive intelligence collection were sent from Washington and signed by Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Rodham Clinton.

One of the cables, signed by Secretary Clinton, lists information-gathering priorities to American staff members at the United Nations headquarters in New York, including “biographic and biometric information on ranking North Korean diplomats.”

While several international treaties prohibit spying at the United Nations, it is an open secret that countries try nevertheless. In one embarrassing episode in 2004, a British official revealed that the United States and Britain eavesdropped on the conversations of Secretary General Kofi Annan of the United Nations in the weeks before the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

The requests for more personal data about foreign officials were included in several cables requesting all manner of information from posts overseas, information that would seem to be the typical business of diplomats.

State Department officials in Asunción, Paraguay, were asked in March 2008 about the presence of Al Qaeda, Hezbollah and Hamas in the lawless “Tri-Border” area of Paraguay, Brazil and Argentina. Diplomats in Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo were asked in April 2009 about crop yields, rates of H.I.V. contraction and China’s quest for copper, cobalt and oil in Africa.

In a cable sent to the American Embassy in Sofia, Bulgaria, in June 2009, the State Department requested information about the Bulgarian government’s efforts to crack down on money laundering and drug trafficking and for “details about personal relations between Bulgarian leaders and Russian officials or businessmen.”

yvesT75
Admin

Messages : 550
Date d'inscription : 09/10/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://iiscn.wordpress.com/about/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Lun 29 Nov - 1:40

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:47, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  kercoz le Lun 29 Nov - 7:40

Trop d'info tue l'info !
Une bonne idée pour faire des tunes pour 2011: faire des ephemerides du type mural qu'on arrachait une feuille tsles jours ; au lieu des histoires droles , mettre une des infos .

kercoz

Messages : 965
Date d'inscription : 24/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  yvesT75 le Lun 29 Nov - 9:55

Arno a écrit:
Sinon, pour reprendre ce que je disais a Nemo, ce genre d'évènement met a jour l'extrême vulnérabilité de l'informatique non, qu'est ce que tu en penses? En dehors du fait qu'ils sont incapables de garder leurs données secrètes, ils sont également incapables d'en bloquer la diffusion Shocked ....
Ou bien, pour être parano jusqu'au bout, doit on comprendre que ces données sont hébergées dans un puissant pays qui est entrain de les utiliser a son profit? Suspect

Oui c'est sur que certains responsables de la sécurité ont du se faire taper sur les doigts... Quand on voit la description de la manière dont les données ont été récupérées :

M. Manning raconte aussi la façon dont il s'y prenait : " j'entrais dans la salle informatique avec un CD musical à la main (…), puis j'effaçais la musique et je créais un dossier compressé (contenant les documents) … J'écoutais Lady Gaga et je chantonnais sur la musique, tout en exfiltrant la plus grande fuite de l'histoire des Etats-Unis ". Il se sent à l'abri, car le système est défaillant : " des serveurs faibles, des mots de passe faibles, une sécurité matérielle faible, un contre-espionnage faible, une analyse bâclée… " Aussitôt après avoir été dénoncé, Bradley Manning est arrêté et incarcéré, d'abord au Koweït, puis dans la base militaire de Quantico (Virginie), près de Washington.
http://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2010/11/28/bradley-manning-un-militaire-desoeuvre-a-l-origine-des-plus-grandes-fuites-de-l-histoire-des-etats-unis_1446090_3210.html

Et à propos de données informatiques ce qui m'a le plus fait halluciné, c'est toutes les pertes qui ont eu lieu en UK récemment, enfin 1 ou 2 ans (me rappelle plus exactement, mais genre des données fiscales pommées sur clé USB ou un truc comme ça)

Et une fois les données sorties, c'est sur qu'avec internet plus moyen de faire grand chose (à l'époque où le moindre disque perso fait 100 ou 200 gigas), et wikileaks mets à chaque fois à disposition tout le paquet en un seul fichier, "au cas où" ...

Ou bien, pour être parano jusqu'au bout, doit on comprendre que ces données sont hébergées dans un puissant pays qui est entrain de les utiliser a son profit? Suspect
Pas sur de comprendre ce que tu veux dire là ?

yvesT75
Admin

Messages : 550
Date d'inscription : 09/10/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://iiscn.wordpress.com/about/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Lun 29 Nov - 11:42

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:47, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  nemo111 le Lun 29 Nov - 11:57

J'ai du mal aussi a avaler l'énormité de la chose. Mais j'ai aussi du mal a imaginer ce qu'aurait a gagner l'administration a se peindre comme des incompétents totaux. Même si la majorité des informations ainsi diffusé étaient là pour nous enfumer les dégats faits à l'image de l'administration tazu est énorme. Je ne sais pas.

nemo111

Messages : 679
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  yvesT75 le Lun 29 Nov - 12:00

Non franchement je n'y crois pas (au fait que cette release serait un "inside job"), on peut être déçu ou douter d' une certaine "banalité de la réalité", mais aussi merveilleuse d'une certaine manière ...

yvesT75
Admin

Messages : 550
Date d'inscription : 09/10/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://iiscn.wordpress.com/about/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Lun 29 Nov - 12:13

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:48, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  nemo111 le Lun 29 Nov - 15:00

Ceci dis on apprend rien de vraiment nouveau pour le moment.

nemo111

Messages : 679
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  alter egaux le Lun 29 Nov - 16:53

nemo111 a écrit:Ceci dis on apprend rien de vraiment nouveau pour le moment.
Je ne suis pas d'accord.
Une des principales nouvelles donnes dite "sensationnelle" est celle ci :
Mais le mémo 219058, adressé à l'ambassade des Etats-Unis à l'ONU, à New York, éclaire à quel point les diplomates sont encouragés à ne respecter aucune règle de l'immunité diplomatique, sans parler de respect de la vie privée. Le secrétaire général des Nations unies, son secrétariat et ses équipes, les agences de l'ONU, les ambassades étrangères et les ONG présentes à Manhattan, sont ainsi, sans même présumer du travail des agences de renseignement, soumis au regard intrusif de la mission diplomatique américaine.
[...]Les diplomates américains à l'ONU doivent transmettre " toute information biographique et biométrique " sur leurs collègues des pays du Conseil de sécurité, y compris les alliés britanniques et français, et sur les dirigeants de nombreux pays. La consigne " biométrique " revient dans presque tous les mémos : il faut se procurer " les empreintes digitales, photographies faciales, ADN et scanners de l'iris " de toute personne intéressant les Etats-Unis.
En diplomatie, c'est assez terrible de lire ceci. L'ambiance va être houleuse après cela. Aucun diplomate ne pourra plus faire confiance à un diplomate américain. Probablement que nous ne mesurons pas les effets à très court terme, mais à long terme,...
Cela me rappelle le constat de F. Mitterrand, après 14 ans à l'élysée :
"La France ne le sait pas, mais nous sommes en guerre contre les Etats-Unis. Une guerre permanente, économique, une guerre sans morts(...) Oui, ils sont très durs les Américains, ils sont voraces, ils veulent un pouvoir sans partage sur le monde. Une guerre inconnue, une guerre permanente, sans morts apparemment, et pourtant une guerre à mort."
avatar
alter egaux

Messages : 609
Date d'inscription : 30/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://transition.xooit.fr/index.php

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  moinsdewatt le Lun 29 Nov - 17:27

A propos des USA vous avez regerdé le reportage hier sur M6 sur les Mormons ?

C' est effrayant.

moinsdewatt

Messages : 92
Date d'inscription : 26/07/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  nemo111 le Lun 29 Nov - 21:12

Je ne suis pas d'accord.
Une des principales nouvelles donnes dite "sensationnelle" est celle ci :
On est pas d'accord en effet. Ca n'a rien de sensationnel. Seul le caractère systématique de la chose est relativement étonnant. Ce genre de chose date déjà de la guerre froide. Ca ne se dis pas mais c'est tout.

nemo111

Messages : 679
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Arno le Lun 29 Nov - 21:55

[


Dernière édition par Arno le Mer 16 Mar - 23:48, édité 1 fois

Arno

Messages : 356
Date d'inscription : 26/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  alter egaux le Mar 30 Nov - 6:26

Vous n'avez aucune patience :
Titou30 : Combien de documents relatifs à la France ont été communiqués au journal Le Monde ?
Rémy Ourdan : Plusieurs milliers.
http://www.lemonde.fr/international/chat/2010/11/29/qu-apportent-les-documents-wikileaks_1446474_3210.html#ens_id=1446075

Un truc de vrai : Sarkozy est susceptible et autoritaire ? On le savait déjà : lol!
avatar
alter egaux

Messages : 609
Date d'inscription : 30/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://transition.xooit.fr/index.php

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  alter egaux le Mar 30 Nov - 15:03

C'est parti pour la France : Jean-Louis Bruguière en guest star !
WikiLeaks dévoile les liens entre juges français et Washington
REUTERS 30.11.2010
WikiLeaks révèle les liens entre des juges antiterroristes français et l'ambassade des Etats-Unis à Paris, qui a eu connaissance des résultats d'enquêtes en principe couvertes par le secret de l'instruction.
Ces documents publiés mercredi par Le Monde risquent de conforter les critiques des avocats et des associations de défense des droits de l'homme, qui accusent ces juges de ne pas agir comme des magistrats indépendants, mais comme une branche du pouvoir politique et du renseignement.
Une note du 24 janvier 2005 obtenue par WikiLeaks évoque ainsi un déjeuner de Jean-Louis Bruguière à l'ambassade des Etats-Unis durant lequel il a "évoqué un certain nombre d'enquêtes en cours qu'il conduit", ce qui est en principe illégal puisque le magistrat est tenu au secret.
Un autre document évoque une visite de Jean-François Ricard, autre magistrat antiterroriste, à l'ambassade des Etats-Unis en 2003 pour évoquer une enquête en cours sur le recrutement en France de combattants islamistes pour l'Irak.
Jean-François Ricard, selon les documents évoqués par Le Monde, a en outre expliqué aux diplomates américains avant la présidentielle de 2007 que Jean-Louis Bruguière recherchait "un poste dans la future administration Sarkozy".
Jean-Louis Bruguière, selon d'autres documents, a expliqué ensuite lui-même qu'il voulait être ministre de la Justice. Il s'est présenté comme candidat pour l'UMP aux législatives de 2007 mais a dû renoncer à ses ambitions après sa défaite.
Jean-Louis Bruguière a ensuite été nommé par les Etats-Unis et l'Union européenne à un poste international chargé de vérifier l'utilisation du réseau de transfert international bancaire Swift dans la lutte antiterroriste.
Les juges antiterroristes français, relève une autre note diplomatique américaine, "opèrent dans un autre monde que celui du reste de la justice".
Les Etats-Unis font état de leur admiration pour le système français et l'incrimination "d'association de malfaiteurs en relation avec une entreprise terroriste", où les critères de preuve sont "bien plus faibles que dans les autres affaires criminelles".
http://www.franceguyane.fr/actualite/france/wikileaks-devoile-les-liens-entre-juges-francais-et-washington-30-11-2010-76154.php
Bruguière a "géré" l'affaire Karachi, et ses rétrocomissions.
Swift, Clearstream, cela ne vous rappelle rien...
avatar
alter egaux

Messages : 609
Date d'inscription : 30/04/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://transition.xooit.fr/index.php

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  yvesT75 le Mar 30 Nov - 16:12

Assange ne compte pas s'arrêter là : la prochaine cible, les banques et le big business !
Aussi si ce n'est encore plus important dans notre contexte ! :


WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange Wants To Spill Your Corporate Secrets
Nov. 29 2010 - 5:04 pm | 298,569 views | 5 recommendations | 23 comments
By ANDY GREENBERG

In a rare interview, Assange tells Forbes that the release of Pentagon and State Department documents are just the beginning. His next target: big business.

Early next year, Julian Assange says, a major American bank will suddenly find itself turned inside out. Tens of thousands of its internal documents will be exposed on Wikileaks.org with no polite requests for executives’ response or other forewarnings. The data dump will lay bare the finance firm’s secrets on the Web for every customer, every competitor, every regulator to examine and pass judgment on.

(For the full transcript of Forbes’ interview with Assange click here.)

When? Which bank? What documents? Cagey as always, Assange won’t say, so his claim is impossible to verify. But he has always followed through on his threats. Sitting for a rare interview in a London garden flat on a rainy November day, he compares what he is ready to unleash to the damning e-mails that poured out of the Enron trial: a comprehensive vivisection of corporate bad behavior. “You could call it the ecosystem of corruption,” he says, refusing to characterize the coming release in more detail. “But it’s also all the regular decision making that turns a blind eye to and supports unethical practices: the oversight that’s not done, the priorities of executives, how they think they’re fulfilling their own self-interest.”

This is Assange: a moral ideologue, a champion of openness, a control freak. He pauses to think—a process that occasionally puts our conversation on hold for awkwardly long interludes. The slim 39-year-old Wiki­Leaks founder wears a navy suit over his 6-foot-2 frame, and his once shaggy white hair, recently dyed brown, has been cropped to a sandy patchwork of blonde and tan. He says he colors it when he’s “being tracked.”

“These big-package releases. There should be a cute name for them,” he says, then pauses again.

“Megaleaks?” I suggest, trying to move things along.

“Yes, that’s good—megaleaks.” His voice is a hoarse, Aussie-tinged baritone. As a teenage hacker in Melbourne its pitch helped him impersonate IT staff to trick companies’ employees into revealing their passwords over the phone, and today it’s deeper still after a recent bout of flu. “These megaleaks . . . they’re an important phenomenon. And they’re only going to increase.”

He’ll see to that. By the time you’re reading this another giant dump of classified U.S. documents may well be public. Assange refused to discuss the leak at the time FORBES went to press, but he claims it is part of a series that will have the greatest impact of any WikiLeaks release yet. Assange calls the shots: choosing the media outlets that splash his exposés, holding them to a strict embargo, running the leaks simultaneously on his site. Past megaleaks from his information insurgency over the last year have included 76,000 secret Afghan war documents and another trove of 392,000 files from the Iraq war. Those data explosions, the largest classified military security breaches in history, have roused antiwar activists and enraged the Pentagon.

Admire Assange or revile him, he is the prophet of a coming age of involuntary transparency. Having exposed military misconduct on a grand scale, he is now gunning for corporate America. Does Assange have unpublished, damaging documents on pharmaceutical companies? Yes, he says. Finance? Yes, many more than the single bank scandal we’ve been discussing. Energy? Plenty, on everything from BP to an Albanian oil firm that he says attempted to sabotage its competitors’ wells. Like informational IEDs, these damaging revelations can be detonated at will.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
http://blogs.forbes.com/andygreenberg/2010/11/29/wikileaks-julian-assange-wants-to-spill-your-corporate-secrets/

Very Happy Very Happy
Ce gars là n'en manque pas quand même ....

yvesT75
Admin

Messages : 550
Date d'inscription : 09/10/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://iiscn.wordpress.com/about/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  nemo111 le Mar 30 Nov - 18:43

C'est moi ou cette gigantesque mise à nu de la corruption de ce système est sans conséquence au de là de "l'indignation" réelle ou simuler? Il y a plus de réaction pour condamner la révélation des documents que le dysfonctionnement révélé par ceux-ci.

nemo111

Messages : 679
Date d'inscription : 21/05/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: USA et democracie: un pluriel bien singulier.....

Message  Contenu sponsorisé


Contenu sponsorisé


Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Page 3 sur 4 Précédent  1, 2, 3, 4  Suivant

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum